Workout Wednesday: Short Circuit!


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Have little time to fit in running AND a strength workout?

Maximize time and perform this circuit routine for an quick, intense full body workout. While improving cardio, you will also increase the calorie burn, develop strength and enhance flexibility which all can contribute to faster and healthier running.

No need for fancy equipment since we will be using bodyweight. Buuuuut, you have to promise to work hard through the entire workout! 

Start with a 400 meter jog or run between each set of exercises. Do each exercise for 30 seconds. Progress up to 800 meter jog or run, and 60 seconds of each exercise.

Warm Up

Jog/Run 400 meters

  • Squats
  • Mountain Climbers
  • Push Ups
  • Windshield Wipers

Jog/Run 400 meters

  • Walking Lunges
  • Jumping Jacks
  • Downward Dog Pushups
  • Flutter Kicks

Jog/Run 400 meters

  • Burpees
  • Alternating Step Ups (ledge/park bench/bleacher)
  • Tricep Push Ups
  • Plank w/Knee

Jog/Run 400 meters

Cool Down

There you go! A mile of running with a full body workout and still plenty of time to go get ice cream, or, I mean, enjoy the rest of your day with your family and friends…and ice cream.

 

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Great shots by Angela Hawk Photography

Workout Wednesday: Hips Don’t Lie

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Runners, and many other athletes, can benefit from adding this short routine into their workout routine. Most runners suffer from weak, tight and under-developed hip muscles and believe me, your hips will not lie – they will let you know when they are struggling. Weak hips can attribute to a myriad of injuries including sciatica, IT band syndrome, runner’s knee, piriformis issues and more.

Think of the hips as the fulcrums of leg levers driving our bodies forward. If your hips are tight, your legs are not going to be able to provide optimal power and speed. Concentrate on your form as you perform each exercise; not only strengthening but being mindful of the movement pattern.

“It’s all in the hips. It’s all in the hips.” – Chubbs, Happy Gilmore

Hip strengthening and mobility exercises should be a part of your weekly plan, whether you are injured or not. You can easily perform these exercises before your next run (or during your next Netflix binge watching sesh). Make the time, so you won’t lose time due to injury.

All exercises will be performed 10 times on each leg.

  • Clamshells
  • Reverse Clamshells
  • Leg Raises
  • Fire Hydrants
  • Donkey Kicks
  • Side Hurdles (front & back)
  • Bent Leg Swings
  • Leg Swings (front/back)
  • Leg Swings (side/side)

 

You will see we need to work on Jeremy’s hip mobility a little (I’m not immune either, need to do this routine more often!).

Get to it!

I’m back!

Holy smokes, I haven’t posted a blog in almost a month! A lot has been going on, so let’s have a #FlashbackFriday recap.

June didn’t include much racing, but lots of crazy hill training, closing out running club and putting finishing touches on an exciting project.

This 3rd session of running club was fun and yes, a little challenging with 40 kiddos! So thankful for all my volunteers who run with us at practices. Each session I coach, I learn a little something new and am always inspired by these young runners. Below is a message I received from one of my runner’s parents:

“You have truly given my son a sport he loves! We have tried t-ball, baseball and basketball. All of which he didn’t complain about going, but we could tell he wasn’t into it at all. This is the first time he has ever been excited to go to practice or do a race! In fact, immediately after the Apple Blossom race, his first words were, “When is my next race?!” This running club has helped him find his sport! Thanks to you and running club, I know he will have many more races he is looking forward to in his future.”

Yes, my heart burst. The joy I receive in helping to foster a love for running in others is unfathomable. Watching someone reaching their goals or overcome an obstacle they didn’t think is possible is truly amazing. Which makes me want to tell you about that project I’ve been working on…

If you haven’t heard by now, my running coach/partner and I launched a new business this month – Runner In Training, LLC! Jeremy and I have been running together for nearly a year and have seen much improvement by combining running and strength workouts. Many times during our early bird runs, we’d chat about the possibility of combining our strengths and offering other runners a comprehensive training program. Since we have similar ambitious personalities, the dream didn’t stay just a dream for long. Once we started sharing ideas, the business was full speed ahead and we can’t wait to share all we have in store over the months to come!

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Side note: We are about to have our 2nd group run tomorrow, so if you are in the area, please join us. Check out the details here:

On the 4th of July, I raced at the Liberty 5K here in Winchester. What a fun race. There were approximately 300 runners, great awards, fun door prizes and a lot of red, white & blue. Prior to the race, I didn’t really set a time goal. Since I am deep into marathon training, shifting into 5K race pace gear was a bit different. I went out hard at a 6 flat with teammate Alex ahead of me by about 50 meters for the first half of the race. Alex and I run track workouts and long runs often side by side so I kept telling myself there was no reason I couldn’t catch him. Around mile 2, I finally passed him up a hill and felt bad for just a second since it was his birthday (Sorry Alex!). The course is a bit challenging with a few late race hills which didn’t phase me too much after all the hill work the previous month. Surprised myself with an 18:45 – a new PR. My favorite part of the race: after I finished, I ran back down to the last hill to encourage other runners and help them push all the way to the finish line as well as cheering on the kids in the mile.

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Check out the new racing kit!

What else has happened since I talked to you last? Well….although I have my degree in Kinesiology, I never had any certifications. I am proud to say after a lot of studying and a tough exam, I received my National Strength and Conditioning Association Certified Personal Training certification! In the near future, I am hoping to add another certification to my name but will tell you more about that one in a future post.

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Update on chasing the unicorn …. Wow, as soon as I wrote that, butterflies started dancing in my stomach. At this point, I am under the 60 day mark for my BQ attempt. Training has been going extremely well. Since the Erie marathon is in early September, there is a chance of warmer temps, so I’ve been trying to adapt to running in higher heat and humidity. One of my major goals in this training cycle has been to stay healthy and injury-free and I’m happy to say I haven’t had any issues. I’ve been averaging 45-60 mile weeks with a lot of variety – track, fartleks, hill repeats, LSD (not as slow as Coach would like I think) and am feeling strong. Training has been a lot of fun and I am thankful for my running crew who is very encouraging and continues to push me every week. 

 

Erie

Sorry so long but I had a lot to say! Hope all of you are enjoying the summer!

Guest Post: Sierra’s Journey

“Feeling healthy and feeling good about yourself is NOT a luxury – it’s an absolute necessity.”

In honor of May being National Mental Health Awareness Month, I asked my daughter Sierra to rehash a social media post she shared late last year about her own journey into better physical and mental health.

From Sierra:

At first, I was very hesitant to share my story of how fitness has positively affected my life because I am not very good at opening up to people but I was encouraged to share my story.

My sophomore year of high school, I was diagnosed with anxiety and depression. I had always noticed when I worked out more often, exercise helped my symptoms. During this time, I was involved in competitive cheerleading and track & field, and I always felt my best after a rigorous practice. The summer before my freshman year of college, I was working out harder than ever. I was constantly in the gym and I felt amazing.

Unfortunately, as soon as I arrived to college, my schedule and habits changed and I completely stopped working out. I continued to be somewhat sedentary and ate unhealthily through my freshman and sophomore years. After two years of not working out and eating whatever I wanted, I had gained 20 lbs. When I realized how much weight I had gained and saw how great of shape Becky was in after a year of getting back into fitness and eating healthier, I became eager to make a change in my life. I was so afraid to begin though. At first, I didn’t know if I would even remember how to workout. I had also become very intimidated by the gym and was afraid to go. I felt as though I would be judged if I went.

In May of 2016, I started running and attending the HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) classes Becky taught at HIIT Like A Girl and eating healthier. Running was the main aspect that really sparked my fire. I had been a sprinter in high school and had never run more than 2 miles at one time. I also thought long distance running looked like torture and had no interest in trying it….until last May.

In the beginning, I started out by running/walking 3 miles a few days a week. Eventually, I was able to run the whole 3 miles. Then, I ran my first 5k on July 4th (Liberty 5k). Running a race felt so incredible and I was happy to finish in under 30 minutes!

When I came back to school for the fall semester, I decided I wanted to try and go back to the gym to start lifting weights. I began going with a friend who knew more about weightlifting which made me feel more comfortable having someone to workout with.

Since last May, my life has changed greatly for the better. Fitness has brought so much more confidence, motivation and positivism into my life. Dealing with anxiety and depression has always made it so hard for me to become and remain motivated. I’ve always had to work extra hard to get myself going every day, and even though I’ve been pretty successful in my life, I had struggled tremendously with getting myself there. I used to have the most difficult time getting myself out of bed before noon. I would often miss class or show up late because I just couldn’t get the motivation to go.

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Now, I wake up much earlier (usually around 8 am) and I even have been getting up at 5:45 am for sunrise yoga on Thursday mornings at my college gym. I find when I start my day out with yoga, I feel so much more relaxed. I also run 3-4 times a week and workout to HIIT videos on YouTube. Not only have I run multiple 5ks, but I have also run an 8k and a two 10ks within a year of starting to run. I would like to run a half marathon by the end of the year, which I would have never thought was a possible goal for me before. In addition, I lost the weight I had gained since freshman year. Goodbye Freshman 15!

It’s truly an unbelievable feeling being able to conquer longer distances and achieve personal records. I also sit down and eat breakfast almost every morning before beginning my day now. I was never really a breakfast type of person before but now I always make sure I have time to eat breakfast because it helps with my energy level.

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I barely missed any class this past semester and the class that I did miss was not due to mental illness. Now, I have the motivation to get through each day with a positive mindset. I’m constantly busy due to school, work, sorority, and working out. I don’t even have much time to watch TV, but I haven’t felt stressed like I would have before. I am so much happier and have set a goal for 2017 of continuing to better myself physically, mentally and spiritually. I want to improve myself in all aspects so that I can become the best version of myself. I would not be where I am right now if I had not started running last year. I am so incredibly blessed to have the ability to be able run and workout, and I want to continue to do so as long as I can. As for the future, I plan to continue learning as much as I can about fitness and nutrition so that I can continue a healthy lifestyle and help other people.

My advice to others?

Starting to work out can be intimidating, but it can be extremely beneficial for anyone suffering from a mental illness. If you’re just starting out and nervous, even a run/walk for 30 minutes 3 days a week can be helpful. I’m not saying exercise will completely cure mental illness, but exercise is a natural form of medication I strongly believe in. I still have bad days but even on my worst days, getting a workout in or going on a run can make a big difference for me.

For anyone who may be struggling with a mental illness, I just want to say I know how it can be stressful and sometimes you feel like there’s no way out, but YOU CAN’T GIVE UP. Keep pushing yourself to find ways to put more positivity in your life; fill your life with positive people who you can lean on when times are rough.

You are stronger than you think and you will get through it.”

Thanks for sharing Sierra!

Dare to Jump

“It is not failure itself that holds you back; it is the fear of failure that paralyzes you.” – Brian Tracy

Some days blog topics come easy, and some days I feel like I’m searching and searching for something to write about. Most of the time, the answer is right there in front of me based on an experience I am either going through or preparing for.

Later this week, I am going to attempt my first official speaking engagement, or rather share my story publicly which sounds way much less intimidating.

I absolutely DREAD standing in front of a crowd and speaking. The thought of doing this is probably just as bad as a fear of the dentist, or nails on a chalkboard.

Yes, that bad.

The thought of being in front of a gathering of people, all eyes on me, is paralyzing.

I worry about what I say, what people are thinking, wishing I was funnier, wishing I could crawl under a table and hide. Fear of judgement. Fear of failure. Fear of passing out.

I’m surprised I haven’t had the cliche dream about imagining I’m in front of an audience and I am only in my underwear….there’s still time.

Yes, I realize I teach group fitness classes and coach a kids running club, but that’s different. Once I’m moving, I get in the zone and my mind just flows better. Hmm, maybe I’ll do jumping jacks while I tell my story.

Back to this heart-pounding experience I am preparing myself for.

A wise man told me recently to be successful, I need to share myself with others. Go out and tell my story to anyone who would listen.

So, in a few days, I am going to put on my big girl panties and just do it. Tell a group about my weight loss and return to running journey. I don’t plan on writing out what I plan to say; just a basic outline. I want to speak from the heart and hopefully something I will say will inspire someone.

Do you share my fear of public speaking? Are you afraid of change? Do you fear being uncomfortable? Maybe you want to start working out but you fear stepping into the gym for the first time? Perhaps you have an idea for a business but you fear the jump.

I will tell you there is beauty in taking the road unknown. Every time we push ourselves into an area we fear, we have a great opportunity to learn about ourselves. Getting comfortable with the uncomfortable is important for personal development.

As I prepared for this post, I came across this article from Forbes: Why Feeling Uncomfortable Is The Key To Success.

An excerpt: “…when you go out of your way to experience new things, or when you let new things happen to you, your body creates brand new neural pathways that fuel your creative spark and enhance your memory”.

The article goes on to explain how we should embrace the uncomfortable. “Putting yourself in new and unfamiliar situations triggers a unique part of the brain that releases dopamine, nature’s make-you-happy chemical.” How about that!? Our fear may actually make us happy!

I challenge you to take a step outside your comfort zone into the fear zone with me. Make a plan and let’s dip our toes into the unknown ocean together.

Let’s give ourselves a chance to grow.

Remember, you are only confined by the walls you build yourself.

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And no… I am not telling you when and where this will speaking engagement will be. Maybe after I get this first one in the bag, another “Story Time with Becky” will come to your town soon 😉

Workout Wednesday: Core

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Runner or not, when the warmer weather arrives we all start thinking of trying to get tank top arms or rock hard abs. Abs may be made in the kitchen, but you still need to work on your core strength in the gym.

So, what do you consider your core?

Most obvious answer may be abdominal muscles, which are actually a very small part of the core. Our core consists of a variety of muscles which stabilize the spine and pelvis, and run the entire length of the torso including our glutes, hamstrings, obliques, and hips.  

In addition to rocking your summer attire, building a stronger core will also help you be a better runner. Benefits of adding core into your workout routine include:

  • Stabilizing muscles we use for posture. Have you ever had the opportunity to see your form at the end of a race; maybe a particularly difficult finish? Our postural muscles begin to fatigue just as much as our legs do. Maximizing power in your glutes and obliques helps create a better running posture and use less excess energy.
  • Stave off injury. Core exercises help reduce injury by helping to withstand the repetitive nature of running.
  • Create a solid foundation. Core exercises can help improve your balance which is helpful in missteps especially on uneven terrain.
  • And of course, you will look good in your racing attire.

Core for Runners V.1

Plank: Assume a basic push-up position. Rest weight on elbows and forearms flat on the floor. Raise hips and maintain a straight line from shoulders to feet. Position can be modified on knees. Hold for up to 60 seconds.

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Target: deep core and strengthen your lower back.

Running Benefit: Helps prepare core for hills and fatigue late in the race.

 

Reverse Plank:  Sit on floor with legs straight out in front of you and arms at your sides. Lift your hips off the ground and hold for up to 60 seconds.

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Target: work on glutes and hamstrings in this plank variation.

Running Benefit: Helps generate explosive power in the stride and protect against injury.

 

Donkey Kicks: Start on your hands and knees – hands should be under shoulders and knees under hips. Flex your feet. Keep the knee bent to 90 degrees and drive one heel up towards ceiling. Squeeze glutes, lower leg and repeat. Do 15-20 repetitions per leg.

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Target: hips, lower back and glutes

Running Benefit: Helps maintain a fluid running stride.

 

Fire Hydrants: Start on your hands and knees – hands should be under shoulders and knees under hips. Raise one leg out to the side, keeping the knee bent at 90 degrees. Raise, lower and repeat. Do 15-20 repetitions per leg.

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Target: hips.

Running Benefit: Injury prevention in hip and knee.

 

Windshield Wipers: Lie on your back on the floor and raise your legs 90 degrees. Spread your arms straight out to your sides for support. Rotate legs to one side, stopping short of touching the floor. Rotate to other side. Do 15 total repetitions.

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Target: obliques, hips.

Running Benefit: Strengthen oblique muscles will help minimize side-to-side motion while running. Less energy expenditure = more efficient runner.

Single Leg Lowering w/Crunch: Lie face up on a mat with both legs straight up in the air. Lower your left leg to ground and return to upright position. Do a crunch up towards legs then return to starting position. Lower right leg, return to upright and crunch. Repeat. Do 15 repetitions per leg.

Target: abs, hips, quads.

Running Benefit: Overall core challenge.

 

Try these exercises after your next run. You don’t need a rock-solid six pack to be a good runner, but a strong core will definitely help (and you’ll feel good too!).

WWPhotoContest

Make sure you take a photo of yourself doing one of the Workout Wednesday exercises then post on the Facebook or Twitter pages of RunningDad.com or RunaissanceMom to be entered to win a prize!

LEGEND® Compression Wear Review

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Several blog posts ago, I discussed how running gear has changed since the last time I hit the pavement approximately 15 years ago. One of the new types of apparel I was seeing runners wear were compression socks and compression leg sleeves. After running the Richmond Marathon and experiencing severe calf cramps, I did wonder if compression sleeves would have helped minimize the discomfort.

Knowing a little about the benefits of compression from being in the health field, I was curious as to the effect on running. One of the awesome guys over at LEGEND® Compression Wear asked if I was interested in trying a pair of their compression socks or sleeves and I was happy to oblige. Since I already have a favorite brand of running socks, I decided to try the leg sleeves.

legend-compression-sizing-chartThe website has an easy to follow guide on how to measure your legs to determine the size you will need to order. The 7 (soon to be 8) colors available are basic solid colors.

After receiving my pair, I wore them around the house for recovery after a relatively tough workout. The sleeves were easy to pull on and off; the material felt soft and hugged my calves. Snug; but not too tight.

16523605_10154254111602747_1633898455_oI tested out the sleeves on a long, slow run at first and also have worn during two recent 5Ks. Both races, I set a new personal record. Coincidence? Maybe. However, I can tell you I did not experience any fatigue in my calves while running. Due to my positive experience with the leg sleeves, I plan on continuing use during long runs, races and for recovery.

Key features and potential benefits of compression for runners:
– Improved endurance
– Increased power output
– Decreased shin splints and calf cramps
– Faster recovery time
– Reduced vibration
– Increased oxygen levels and blood circulation
– Moisture wicking and UV protection

LEGEND® Compression Wear differs from other companies offering similar products due to their background in medical compression therapy. All products are proudly made in the USA.

In addition to a great product, I also love their mission statement. “The mission of LEGEND® Compression Wear is to improve the performance of every athlete—from the casual jogger to the competitive triathlete. Our sports compression socks, sleeves & apparel are designed with you in mind so you can perform at your best. Our mission is to promote the notion that LEGENDS are created from great people, great courage and great accomplishments.”

Want to make 2017 LEGENDARY? Follow this link for $15 OFF your first order at LEGEND® Compression Wear. Why not try? There is a 30 Day Satisfaction Guarantee – if you are not completely satisfied with your product, you may return free of charge within 30 days of your purchase.

I, myself, would be interested in brighter colors or patterned sleeves (runners like to be a little flashy). However, LEGEND® Compression Wear wanted to keep the focus on the athlete with a simple and understated design. So join me, and be a LEGEND.

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