Race Recaps – Two-for-Tuesday

Spring racing has been quite fun and May was no different. This past month featured two local races – the Apple Blossom 10K and the Loudoun Street Mile.

Race #1 – 10K: Sometimes it’s just not your day…

The Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival is HUGE in Winchester – there are many events that span over the course of two weeks and the Apple Blossom 10K falls on the last Saturday of the festival. Since money is awarded the top finishers, the race usually brings in a few elite competitors from the region.

After solid races at Shamrock Half and Cherry Blossom 10, I set a new 10K goal of 38:00 which would be pushing the pace. Last year was my first time racing AB10 and I ran 47:40, so dropping a sub 40 would be great.

Race morning was cool and rainy. Team Running Dad planned to meet up for a warm up – and for once, all of us were racing! We gathered together and ran a warm up mile through the brisk, misty morning. Soon, it was race time and we tossed our warm up clothes to reveal our shockingly bright neon pink and green racing gear. It was time to go!

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Last year, the first mile was tough – lots of weaving in and out through the crowd. This year, I started near the front and the start was much easier. First split was a 6:23 – and about this time, I realized today was just not my day. My legs felt fatigued and tight; but I just kept putting one foot in front of the other. My finish was 40:19 (drats!) which was off my goal, but hey, still a PR!

Highlights of the race:

  • Racing local is great – I loved the crowd support and hearing so many people cheering!
  • Family race – 4 out of 5 family members (husband, daughter and son) ran the 10k, including my 10 year old son (his first 10K) who surprised me. I was at one of the turnaround points and hear “Let’s go MOM!” and could not believe how close he was to me! He ended up running a 42:18. Husband and daughter also did well in their first 10ks!
  • Racing with Team Running Dad – the energy in this group is electric. We are competitive, supportive and, at times, immature, but we have a lot of fun. Very lucky to run with this crew.
  • My mom, sister, brother-in-law, niece and nephew were at the race! Since they live in PA, they aren’t able to see many races. Loved hearing them in the crowd.
  • Running near Josh and Duane in the beginning of the race and witnessing Josh grab a donut from someone cheering and proceed to eat while running.
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My son and I post-race

Race #2: The BEAST – mile race…

Historically a half-miler and miler, this should be my race – but it was WAY easier 20 years ago. Last year, I ran a 6:03 and was hoping to at least hit a 5:45 this year. My son has been hitting 5:45-5:50s in the past few months and he set a new goal of 5:30. We may or may not have made a little side bet on who was going to win this year…

Last week, I checked out what quarter mile splits I’d need to hit for a 5:20. I thought it was a bit of a reach, but I’m always up for a challenge. 1:22s… ok, why not try?

Race morning was perfect. I put on my new bumblebee shorts, Topo ST2s, Injinji socks, Goodr shades and grabbed my RaceDots. Picked up my race packet and ran to the start to meet my 32 running club kiddos who were also racing.

Wheeew, the butterflies were really in my stomach before the race. When you are used to running 5ks and halfs…the mile is a whole new ballgame. After I warmed up the kids, stretched a bit – it was time for my race..or so I thought. 15 minute delay. Bummer. I continued to keep on moving, chat with local running friends and my running club kids. Then, it was time to get on the line.

Best part of the race start was having a little cheering section – my running club kids were right there cheering for me and throwing me the thumbs up sign. All the feels – I was smiling inside and out; seeing their little faces calmed my nerves. Unfortunately, the starting gun malfunctioned (I think we had 3 tries) which made my nerves return a little each time. However, on the 4th attempt, the ladies were off.

First split: 1:19. Ok, a slight rise and then you’ll hit the downhill. 1:23.2 was next – a little off but we’ll take it. Starting the descent – didn’t check out my 3rd quarter but was 1:21. Time to fly. I was feeling strong and could see the finish line ahead. I picked up the pace and was able to catch another runner. Again, another great local crowd to cheer on the runners and they pulled me through the homestretch. Overall time, 5:21.8. I’ll take it!

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Down the stretch

Next up were the kids, girls first. I waited in anticipation for our orange shirts to come down the hill. So excited to see two of our girls in the top – and equally as excited to see two of our girls in the back of the pack…holding hands while running, helping each other finish. Love. My older niece who lives in PA entered the race and also ran a personal best!

Boys race next, including my son and my running partner/coach’s son. These two…wow – they’ve been running pretty equal times for years. As I saw the leaders come down the hill, I saw Connor in 2nd and Dylan in 3rd. Dylan started to sprint and the race literally came down to the wire. Dylan by a nose. Wow – watching them battle through the finish was amazing. I think this rivalry will continue for awhile and I’m very excited to watch them continue to improve. Also in the top 10 for the boys race were 2 other boys from our running club. Solid finishes.

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Dylan & Connor

Overall, about 17 out of my kids had personal records at the race. If they didn’t PR, they still ran a great race.

Last race of the day included Team Running Dad teammates Jeremy and Mario. Neither of them were very excited to race a mile, but I knew they’d still rock. The men’s race was pretty stacked – the lead group was pretty stacked but the TRD guys weren’t far behind. Both looked strong. Jeremy clocked a 4:58 and Mario – 5:18 (DARN! I was soooo close!).

So many other local runners kicked butt at this mile race – you all know who you are. Shoutout to the Thursday morning striders group!

May was a great month and now on to June. Next up, Virginia Wine Country Half. I ran this last year and said I’d never do it again. Never say never….

Book Review: How Bad Do You Want It?

“You can keep going and your legs might hurt for a week, or you can quit and your mind will hurt for a lifetime.” — Mark Allen

A few months ago, I discussed the mental battle many of us feel when running whether you are a beginner or an experienced runner. A friend read my post and mentioned I should read How Bad Do You Want It? by Matt Fitzgerald. 9781937715410

So, during a cold winter weekend, I downloaded a copy and curled up on the couch to gather some knowledge about the mental game. I knew this book would speak to me, but I wasn’t prepared for the negative emotional effect.

I’ll admit the beginning of the book was tough for me to read. To be brutally honest, I was pissed off. Sometimes reading the truth and admitting previous self defeat really sucks.

In college, I felt like that athlete who “pulled up lame”. I was tired. I had lost interest. My passion for running was at a low. I’ll confess I claimed a fake injury once or twice during a race when I couldn’t hang. So many life changes had occurred when I was in college and some days I felt I was just a lost ship at sea. Or maybe I just stopped trying.

For years, my goal was to use my running talent to earn a college scholarship. Looking back, once I achieved this major feat, I don’t recall setting a new goal. No goal to win the 800m at ACCs or qualify for NCAAs. Did I stop dreaming? Was I just happy to settle and have college athletics be my final destination? Unsure.

I’ve strayed – back to the story.

This book is a collection of stories about athletes who share their experiences; their battles and the coping mechanisms they have used to conquer the beast within themselves. I especially enjoyed reading about a runner named Jenny and her disaster of a race at 2009 NCAA Cross Country Championships. Later, you find out her married name – Jenny Simpson – who was just in the most recent Olympics.

Upon finishing this particular chapter, I thought, “thank goodness”. I am not the only one. This fierce battle between mind and matter even happens to the best of the best.
Pushing yourself out of your comfort zone into the area where running is HARD is difficult for everyone. During a typical 5K, you have at least 3,000 steps to conjure up many thoughts – good or bad. And the bad tends to scream much louder than the good.

Since finishing the book, I have utilized a couple key tips while racing.

Embrace the hurt. Accept the fact that some of your run/race may be tough.

One of our local 5ks ends with a windy, gradual uphill about a half mile long. During the race, I knew it would be in front of me soon. I told myself, accept the challenge; yes – it will hurt. But you WILL run the hill and you will be finished soon. Fitzgerald mentions bracing yourself for a tough race or workout can boost performance by 15% or more.

Preparing yourself for the inevitable helps.

Also, reading and being reminded your brain is going to try to quit before your body is ready to give up. Studies show although you mentally feel you cannot take another step, your muscles are not at maximum effort yet. Mind over matter or matter over mind??

I encourage you to read this book if you’ve ever engaged in this mental war while running. You can admit you do – it’s more common than you think.

Whether you are an elite runner or a recreational jogger, I’m sure your mind has tried to make you quit before your body was ready. Arm yourself with a few coping tools and next time, you’ll be prepared to power through!

Now years later, my passion has been reignited and I’m back to racing. I feel as though I’ve been given a second chance to give it my all.

From here on out, and especially when I toe the line chasing that BQ, I will I ask myself, “How bad do you want it?”.

The answer?

Bad…very, very bad.

Forged by Fire

One day I woke up and decided I didn’t want to feel like that anymore, or ever again. So I changed. Just like that.

Sounds easier said than done, right?

I was tired of feeling tired all of the time. Tired of saying, “I’d like to”s.

I’d like to run again.

I’d like to lose weight.

I’d like to look fit.

It only takes a spark to get a fire going.

My runaissance has not had any boundaries; no finish line. Surrounded by those who inspire me on a daily basis, my spark has turned back into a raging fire. For years, my drive to succeed and be healthy sometimes felt more like a pile of smoldering ashes.

I’m not getting any younger. The days of becoming an elite runner may be behind me. Will this stop me? Probably not.

Some ask why? Why are you so competitive? Why not just run?

I reply, why not?

Why not show my children it’s never too late to try?

Why not see how far I can go?

Why not give it one last hurrah?

Recently, I watched the video below (by the way, this YouTube channel is amazing; you may become addicted to their vids). Check this out:

Wow, mind blown.

As mentioned, this message reminded me I may not even have scratched the surface yet of what I CAN do. I am willing to put in the work, even if it means waking up at 4 a.m. and working long days.

I am willing to risk failure in hopes of succeeding. I am willing to throw out lofty (but attainable) goals.

From the beginning of my return to running, my focus has not been trying to beat others. You may have seen me say I am chasing the old me. She was pretty fast and this may seem unattainable, but you can bet I am trying my hardest to catch her. Most of the time when I finish a race, a voice whispers, “maybe you can go a little faster.”  Runner problems.

And I don’t feel this way just about running – this applies in my work life as well. Returning to the fitness industry has revitalized a passion for helping others. Sharing my story – the peaks and the valleys – has allowed me have the opportunity to encourage and guide others on their own journey. I love this. My mind is full of possibilities and dreams of where this can lead.

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My soul is on fire.

Every morning when I wake up, I know there is someone else doing the same and possibly wanting the same success as I do; maybe even more. If I am not committed (some mistakenly call this obsessed) with getting better and doing more than everyone else, I may be left behind.

I hear footsteps every day.

Why someday? Why not today? I do not want to be left behind.

I feel forged by fire – stick around and see where my journey goes…

 

Race Recap: Credit Union Cherry Blossom 10 Mile Run

Teamwork makes the dream work.

One more race recap and then we will get back to our regular programming!

cucblogoTwo weeks post Shamrock Half and I was ready to rock again. On my radar this time was the Credit Union Cherry Blossom 10 Miler in Washington, DC.

The entire weekend was quite an adventure! Before we get to starting line, let’s start on the day prior when I headed to the nation’s capital with several members of Team Running Dad.

We traveled down Rt 66 to catch the metro to pick up our packets at the race expo at the National Building Museum. The trip wasn’t too bad – as a bunch of folks from the mountains, we didn’t have too much trouble trying to navigate our way through public transportation. Upon our arrival, we decided to get our packets first then find lunch (although we had a few hangry guys!).

Packet pickup was very easy and we browsed the expo booths. Vendors were most we

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Sara, Mario and me with our bibs!

see often at other races, but we saw our fearless SVR leader Vernon at the Ragnar tent. After a quick spin through the booths, we headed towards Gallery Place in search of nourishment.

Eventually, we found our way to food but unfortunately, we waited FOREVER for our orders. As we sat at the bar, we pilfered celery meant for Bloody Marys to satisfy our appetites. After what seemed like a very long time, we finally received (almost) all of our food (poor Josh). On the ride home, we acted a little less mature than our age – but some funny memories were definitely made.

We finalized our plans for race day, which included a VERY early a.m. departure (next year, not so early). As is common for me these days, I woke before my alarm and started to get ready. Today, I was racing for the first time in a Team Running Dad race kit. Prior

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Team Running Dad!

to the race, the team as a whole decided to wear pink shorts (yes, even the guys) in honor of NICU babies and for Alohi, the recent preemie granddaughter of teammate Mario. To complete the outfit, I also slapped on a RunningDad.com temporary tattoo once again.

Having to travel so far race morning, I did have a little anxiety about traffic and other logistics, but once again, the ride was smooth sailing. We arrived early (way too early), but found our parking spot and broke bread together in the car (thanks for the bread Josh!). After eating our breakfast, we went off on foot in search for the starting line as well as port ‘o pots.

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DC or bust!

The starting line of CUCB10 is right at the Washington Monument. We waited a little while in the chilly darkness in the bag check tent (until we got kicked out). As we went on our warm-up run around the reflecting pool, the sun was rising behind the Washington Monument. Wow, what a beautiful sight.

Not too long after, we headed to our respective corrals – the guys and I hugged Sara while she went into the red corral and we entered yellow. Once we were in, it suddenly seemed like a family reunion as other runners from back home found us. After hellos, high fives and final pre-race instructions from the starter, we were off!

My goal for the race was 1:05, which would be pushing my pace a little more than I was comfortable, but I set off for a 6:30 pace with teammate Alex and another running friend Duane. First mile wasn’t as crowded as I anticipated and went by rather quick – nearly on the dot at 6:31. The race course included three out-and-back sections where we could see and cheer each other on before heading to the lonely back half of the course. I picked up the pace as we headed towards the first out-and-back where I was hoping to see Mario and Jeremy. Each time, we either sent a thumbs up, an air fist bump or shouted some encouragement – thanks guys!

In the first half, I felt like I was having a tough time settling in at my goal pace. Miles kept ticking by a little faster than I was aiming for, but I was feeling strong. Around mile 6, I heard someone say my name and pass by – fellow Terrapin XC/Track alumni Jay (who is also seeking a BQ in 2017!). I kept him in my sights and kept chugging ahead. When I felt as though I was struggling or tense, I did sneak a peek over to the water and try to take in the sights of DC.

Around mile 9, I could feel fatigue entering my leg muscles, but kept charging on. Unexpectedly, another Maryland XC/Track alumni was around this section and gave me a little boost of much-needed energy. At this point, I could see the Washington Monument and knew the finish was near. I loved the signs counting down the distance to the finish (1 mile, 1200, 800, 400…). At the end, there is a slight incline and I reminded myself to give the same effort and tackle the last challenge. Heading up the hill, I noticed an older woman running right in front of me and I thought, wow, look at her! I was so focused on getting to the line and passed her without much of a glance. I didn’t realize until after the race, it was Joan Benoit Samuelson! Wow, so cool.

Heading towards the finish, I gave whatever I had left and crossed the line in 1:03:50. Goal achieved! Now to find my teammates which didn’t take long since they were still in the chute. And once again, I was ecstatic to hear Jeremy and Mario had PRs as well. We waited near the finish for Alex and Sara who also had great races – way to kick butt
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2017 marked the 45th year of CUCB10. To celebrate, anyone beating the winning male and female times from 1973 received a mug stating, “I would have won this race in 1973!”.


After everyone was reunited, we linked up with a few other running friends, went back to the car to freshen up and find food (we eat a lot!). After a scenic route to the restaurant (sorry!!), we enjoyed a great Irish brunch and drinks!


Overall, another solid weekend. What a great crew – everyone is supportive and our collective positive energy makes each of us strive to be better. We are all looking forward to the next time we race together, but for now, we are anxiously awaiting to see what Mario, Jeremy and Alex do in Boston.

Thanks to Josh and John for driving and supporting the team over the weekend. We all appreciated you being there.

Having this much fun should be a crime!

Until next time,

Becky

Special 2-for-1 Deal – Check out the race recap from TeamRunningDad’s Coach – Jeremy!

Race Recap: Anthem Shamrock Half Marathon

“There is magic in misery. Just ask any runner.” – Dean Karnazes

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Several days leading up to the Anthem Shamrock Half Marathon, the weather forecast looked less than ideal. Temperatures would be around 40 with winds and a high chance of rain. As race day neared, the hope of better weather diminished and I just embraced the suck.

My husband and I arrived on Saturday (day before the race) and headed straight to the race expo to pick up our race packets. The expo was small, but all the usual vendor categories were featured. I was able to meet the authors of Run Fast. Eat Slow.: Shalane Flanagan and Elyse Kopecky. My senior year of college, I ran against Shalane in the ACC Cross Country Championships, so chatting with her while she signed my cookbook was definitely a highlight.

As I was leaving the expo, I also ran into someone from my high school unexpectedly. Very cool.

My shakeout run was a little creaky. After a near 4 hour car ride, my legs felt stiff and I didn’t feel loose until after a mile. I felt nervous and anxious after the short run, but mentally, was ready to go. After a quick shower and a little basketball watching, we headed down to dinner. Our hotel served a simple pasta buffet meal for any Shamrock runners, so I filled up on penne and continued to hydrate.

17453601_10154383654082747_1370655117_oRace morning, I awoke on my own at 4 a.m. As I pulled back the curtain to glance at the weather outside, I almost laughed out loud. Dark, steady rain, windy, cold. Somewhat fitting for March Madness weekend. I noshed on my pre-race breakfast (peanut butter toast, unsweetened applesauce and Nuun) and dressed in my Shamrock race kit. To stay somewhat warm and dry, I layered on some old clothes and a high-tech windbreaker: a hotel trash bag.

The awful weather quelled my nerves as I jogged up to the starting area. As I warmed up and dodged puddles, the situation made me smile. I joked with volunteers as I ran by – “it’ll be fun they said”. Near the start, I ran into my running partner/coach and another running friend from back home. We all stood around the starting line; trying to stay warm and prepare ourselves for 13.1 soggy and blustery miles.

About 5 minutes until gun time, we moved into our corral and begrudgingly took off our sopping wet outer layers. These last minutes honestly were the worst part of the entire race – standing in the cold, wet darkness as the breeze continued to pick up. Soon, the starters called us to the line. Coach Jeremy asked, “Are you ready?” Ready as I’ll ever be.

Approximately a week before the race, Jeremy and I discussed a race goal. Last year, I ran my first two half marathons and both were right around the low 1:50s. This time, my training base was much stronger and had also built speedwork into my regimen. We set a goal of 1:35 or faster and I set out to maintain a 7:15 pace.

Off the line, I could see the 1:35 pace group ahead of me and I increased my pace to bring up the rear of the group. Listening to our feet pound the wet pavement, we sounded like a pack of horses on a renegade mission. Our group moved as one tight pack through the first miles, knocking out a 7:05 pace. The winds blew, but I stayed tucked in behind the group and before I realized it, we were at mile 5.

At this point, the course started to turn back and the winds shifted direction. I was feeling pretty good and decided to pull away from the group. Mile after mile, I felt stronger and stronger. Glancing down, I could see I was dipping into the 6s, and truly was surprising myself.

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Thumbs up!

Around mile 7, the wind was pretty wild. At one point, there was an opening between the dunes and sand was whipping through. Nothing like a little skin exfoliation while you are running. From this point on, I thought of my usual Tuesday/Thursday a.m. 6 mile runs – telling myself – “Alright, you got this – just on one of your usual morning runs to the park.” One foot in front of the other and the miles just kept flying by. I fell in step with another runner around mile 10 and we were stride from stride until we made the final turn which would take us to the boardwalk and ultimately, to the finish line. As I glanced ahead, I could see the clock was still in the 1:20s and I was full steam ahead. I crossed the finish line is 1:29:10; over 5 minutes faster than my goal and 20 minutes faster than my times from 2016.

 

Finish Line Fun – Coach Jeremy and I showing off our medals!

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The Anthem Shamrock Half has been my most insane, but most favorite race. Looking

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Husband’s 1st Half!

back at my stats and remembering what I powered through puts me back on my runner’s high. Sharing the experience with others was also amazing: my husband completed his first half marathon (HUGE!!), my coach/running partner shaved ~4 minutes off and set a new PR, and several other running friends conquered all Mother Nature threw at us. The memories will sure live on for quite awhile. And the icing on the cake – unexpectedly, it looks like I secured 1st place in my age group (as did Coach Jeremy) – awards will be mailed in a couple weeks.
There will always be conditions which are out of your control. I’ve learned to not stress about what I cannot change; but to accept and embrace the situation as is. Make the most out of what you are given. Just because the environment is less than perfect does not mean you cannot have the race of your life.

Before Shamrock, I had not run a long race since my 1st marathon in November and being able to maintain the pace I did has certainly boosted my confidence in achieving a BQ this year. Training is just around the corner and I continue to become more eager to start as the days near.

Big thanks to my husband who puts up with my running insanity, my coach who runs with me a few times a week at o’dark thirty through a myriad of crazy weather conditions and to all of my running partners. I continue to succeed due to all of you!

Next up, Cherry Blossom 10 Miler with most of my Team Running Dad!

Coached by:

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Race Recap: SVR Winter Series 2016-2017

Staying motivated to run in the winter can be challenging. During the warmer17125165_10212738307679542_592867006_n months, there is a plethora of races to train for, but once the frigid air descends, chances to race may be far and few between.

Luckily, Shenandoah Valley Runners offers an 8 race winter series from December to March to help runners stay on top of their game and also have fun. Each race, runners earn points relevant to their place. The two lowest scoring races are tossed and scores are added up. Awards are given at the end of the series instead of individual races.

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Out of the eight races, all but one were 5Ks. Some races had themes – one was a 2-person team event, one was a poker run and in another runners were encouraged to support their favorite basketball team for March Madness. In addition to runners just racing, tangible and monetary donations were accepted each race for a variety of local non-profit groups. Love the giving back aspect.

 

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Old shoes collected for donation

For being a winter event, we were lucky enough to have fair weather for most races and only one needed to be canceled due to ice. Otherwise, nearly 300 runners toed the line almost every 2 weeks to attempt to maintain or increase their running fitness.

I greatly enjoyed my first Winter Series – hit a few PRs, met new friends and loved the camaraderie between my fellow harriers. We united in laughter and in fatigue; supporting one another through each race.


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Overall Female: 2nd Place

Female 35-39: 1st Place

Best 5K: 19:11

Thank you to all of the organizers who worked hard to execute each race and to the volunteers and spectators who braved the elements to help us crazy runners.

Although I am thankful for spring to be upon us, I definitely have one reason to look forward to this December and the bleak winter months!

Until next time,

Becky

BQ Journey – Step 1: Find a coach.

“A coach is someone who tells you what you don’t want to hear, who has you see what you don’t want to see, so you can be who you have always known you could be.” – Tom Landry

Although once a seasoned and competitive runner, returning to running after 1.5 decades was intimidating. When I was younger, I regretfully never kept a running log of workouts, which would have been great to help create a skeleton training plan. Now, older and out of shape, I had many worries. How do I start? How much is too much? Am I going to get hurt?After researching online, I decided to start with a popular couch to 5K run/walk program which definitely helped me as a beginner.

Prior to training for a full marathon, I Googled the heck out of marathon plans. Let me tell you, there are a LOT of sources to choose from and also a variety of training levels on each plan. Taking into account what I knew would be feasible for me, I created a patchwork plan sourcing information from about three different sites. My goal was simply finishing the marathon, so I chose what I felt would work best for me to achieve that goal.

During my early searches, sites for running coaches would often appear.  When thinking of coaching, I would just think of high school sports or elite athletes. Honestly, I was unaware adults were hiring running coaches. As I set my sites on looking to qualify for Boston, I began to consider having someone tailor a specific and personalized training plan for me. I enjoy creating my own plans for shorter races, but the marathon is a whole new ballgame.

My prior experience with coaches has varied from bad to good to best. The best running coach I had was in high school – he tailored the workouts to my needs (my body didn’t respond to traditional long distance workouts), he listened to my aches and pains, reined me in when needed and we communicated well. I’ve also been on the flipside with a coach I didn’t connect with – and honestly, I never performed my best (fault on both sides). Once I decided to have someone help guide me to BQ, I knew it was essential to find a coach that would mesh well with me and my goals.

One of my training partners just happens to be a Road Runners Club of America Certified Coach. Today, Coach Jeremy of RunningDad.com takes on questions I posed to him regarding coaching runners.

Who do you want to coach? Beginner/competitive runners? Would you coach kids?
 
Coach Jeremy: I have coached brand new runners and Boston qualifiers. No matter the experience level, I enjoy helping my athletes establish goals and plan toward meeting and exceeding them. 
 
With beginners, it is all about getting started and building off of each run, in a controlled manner. Doing too much, too fast, is the leading cause of injury for new runners. I collect as much feedback as I can from the athletes to either push them out of their comfort zone when necessary, or pull the reins when rdlogonecessary.
 
With competitive runners, it is all about goals and staying focused on those goals. There can be a lot of outside interference that can impede the path to those goals. My job is help navigate those roadblocks and determine the best way to reach the targeted outcome. 
 
I would love to work with coaching kids on their running. I have coached kids in all sports as my sons work their way through rec and travel sports, but I have not coached kids specifically at running. It is my goal to establish a kids running program under the Running Dad Coaching umbrella.
 
What is your coaching style like? 
 
Coach Jeremy: I would describe my coaching style as flexible, fluid, and fun. My athletes are not professional runners. I am not a professional runner. Work and family takes up a lot of time. I understand the time crunch and help my athletes establish a routine that works for their lifestyle. As opposed to finding an online training plan or one from a book or magazine, I cater each workout to the individual. Based on feedback from each run, I may change the upcoming workouts to best suit the athlete and what they have happening in their lives. I interact with each of my athletes and we have fun. Whether it is sharing a funny story from a run, a personal achievement outside of running, or just chatting about life in general – I try and keep my athletes happy and the training fun.
 
What can an athlete expect from you when hiring you to coach?
 
Coach JeremyAccountability. I care how my athletes are doing in their pursuit of their goals. I am invested in their success and share in their failures. I treat our relationship like a partnership. We are in it together to reach our goals. Having a coach that is invested in your success is a great motivator.
 
What do you feel makes for an effective coach/athlete relationship?
 
Coach JeremyCommunication is the biggest part of a coach/athlete relationship. I feel that the runners I have the most communication with are the ones that are constantly making the most progress. It takes a lot of the guesswork out of what will work best for my athletes and their lifestyle. Like any relationship, communication is key.
 
11187340_845998035454229_2191515153486588883_oWhy should someone hire you as a coach?/What should a runner look for in a coach?
 
Coach JeremyA runner should hire me to coach them to help navigate the path to their goals. I started from scratch, with no coach, just with a goal to lose weight. I made a lot of mistakes. I was often injured. I had no clue what I was doing. Then I hired a coach. My coach spent more time holding me back, than pushing me to my limits. That was a good thing, for me. I have come a long way, and I like to share what I have learned. I derive a lot of pleasure from helping people reach their goals. I feel my style of coaching gives an athlete someone they can trust to keep them on track and prevent injury. 
 
I am always trying to learn more about getting the most out of my running abilities. I share what I learn with my athletes and also learn from what they find works the best for them. 
 
When looking for a coach, I recommend finding someone who will take a realistic look at your goals and discuss what it takes to get there. If your ideas and philosophies don’t match up, move on. It is an ongoing relationship, and you need to be comfortable with the person that you have asked to help guide you in your running.
 
Give me your greatest strength in coaching and your greatest weakness.
 
Coach JeremyMy greatest strength in coaching is my experience. I went from couch potato to ultra marathoner. I learned a lot. I love to share that knowledge to help others. 
 
My greatest weakness that I am still working on is time management. I would love to dedicate more time to my athletes – to be able to actually run with them if they are local – to be able to be available for phone calls or video chats throughout the day. But with work and family, coaching is not my main focus; not my all-day job. I do the best I can and someday hope to be a full-time running coach.
 
What are your qualifications?
 
Coach Jeremy:
RRCA Certified Running Coach (Road Runners Club of America)
CPR Certified
 
Running Experience:
Boston Marathon qualifier multiple times
Sub 3 hour marathoner
Multiple ultramarathons – up to 50 miles and training for a 100 miler
Competitive times for my age group
 
How do you measure success?
 
Coach Jeremy: Success for me as a runner, and as coach, is to find a way to navigate life’s path without hitting the wall. Always moving forward, even if it requires a few steps back to find a new route. Roadblocks for runners can be injury, losing the drive to set and reach goals, or an unforeseen situation that keeps us from running. Every time I lace up my shoes and step out the door, or see an athlete complete a workout I prescribed, I see those as successes.
 
What made you want to be a coach?
 
Coach JeremyPeople had told me that my own personal transformation and successes as a runner were an inspiration to them. That made me feel really good about what I was doing, I decided I would like to help other people find their own successes and healthier lifestyles. 
 
What is your favorite workout? 
 
Coach JeremyOn the track, I am partial to Yasso’s 800’s. These are 10×800 meter repeats with an equal amount of rest time between each round. They give you comparable numbers from each time you do them, so you can judge your progress by looking back at previous workouts. 
 

Off the track, long slow runs with friends are hard to beat.

 

Coach Jeremy & Team Running Dad after the 2015 Richmond Marathon:
2 Qualified for Boston!
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Thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule to tell us more about you and why we should hire a running coach.

Be sure to visit RunningDad.com to check out a plan that might work for you whether it be monthly coaching or working towards a half or full marathon. I am fortunate he lives in the same city I do; but Coach Jeremy is able to coach you no matter where you live via apps, phone/web chats and more.

I am nervous, yet extremely excited to work with a coach to help guide me to a (hopefully) BQ time. I’ve selected an early September marathon, so look for BQ training updates to begin in early May. Game on!

Until next time,

Becky